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Citations

"About Premenopause." 34 Menopause Symptoms. N.p., 2016. Web. 15 Mar. 2017. http://www.34-menopause-symptoms.com/premenopause-about.htm

Conrad Stöppler, Melissa, MD. "Menopause: 9 Symptoms to Look for and Age of Transition." EMedicineHealth. Ed. William C. Shiel, MD, FACP, FACR. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2017. http://www.emedicinehealth.com/menopause/article_em.htm

Mayo Clinic Staff. "Female Infertility: Symptoms and causes." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER), 24 Nov. 2016. Web. 15 Mar. 2017. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/female-infertility/symptoms-causes/dxc-20214762

Mayo Clinic Staff. "Female Infertility: Overview." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER), 24 Nov. 2016. Web. 15 Mar. 2017. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/female-infertility/home/ovc-20231706

Laven, Joop. "Genetics of Early and Normal Menopause." Seminars in Reproductive Medicine 33.06 (2015): 377-83. PubMed.gov. Web. 13 Mar. 2017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26569518

"Menopause and Perimenopause - Exams and Tests." WebMD. Healthwise, Incorporated, n.d. Web. 09 Mar. 2017. http://www.webmd.com/menopause/tc/menopause-and-perimenopause-exams-and-tests

"Menopause In-Depth Report." The New York Times. The New York Times, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2017. http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/menopause/print.html.

Deliveliotou, Aikaterini, and George Creatsas. "Changes in the Vulva and Vagina Throughout Life." The Vulva (2006): 36-37. Print.

UHN Staff. "Symptoms of Perimenopause -What Are They and How to Manage Them with Natural Perimenopause Treatment." University Health News. University Health News, 02 Apr. 2015. Web. 09 Mar. 2017. http://universityhealthnews.com/daily/aging-independence/symptoms-of-perimenopause-what-are-they-and-how-to-manage-them-with-natural-perimenopause-treatment/.

"Perimenopause and Pregnancy." 34 Menopause Symptoms. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Mar. 2017. http://www.34-menopause-symptoms.com/articles/can-i-get-pregnant-during-perimenopause.htm.

Avis, Nancy E., Sybil L. Crawford, Gail Greendale, Joyce T. Bromberger, Susan A. Everson-Rose, Ellen B. Gold, Rachel Hess, Hadine Joffe, Howard M. Kravitz, Ping G. Tepper, and Rebecca C. Thurston. "Duration of Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms Over the Menopause Transition." JAMA Internal Medicine175.4 (2015): 531-39. Print.

"Menopause and Perimenopause -Exams and Tests." WebMD. Healthwise, Incorporated, n.d. Web. 09 Mar. 2017. http://www.webmd.com/menopause/tc/menopause-and-perimenopause-exams-and-tests.

Prairie, Beth A., MD, MPH, Stephen R. Wisniewski, PhD, James Luther, MA, Rachel Hess, MD, MS, Rebecca C. Thurston, PhD, Katherine L. Wisner, MD, MS, and Joyce T. Bromberger, PhD. "Symptoms of Depressed Mood, Disturbed Sleep, and Sexual Problems in Midlife Women: Cross-Sectional Data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation." Journal of Women's Health 24.2 (2015): 119-26. Web. 13 Mar. 2017.

"Menopause In-Depth Report." The New York Times. The New York Times, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2017. http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/menopause/print.html.

Deliveliotou, Aikaterini, and George Creatsas. "Changes in the Vulva and Vagina Throughout Life." The Vulva (2006): 36-37. Print.

UHN Staff. "Symptoms of Perimenopause -What Are They and How to Manage Them with Natural Perimenopause Treatment." University Health News. University Health News, 02 Apr. 2015. Web. 09 Mar. 2017. http://universityhealthnews.com/daily/aging-independence/symptoms-of-perimenopause-what-are-they-and-how-to-manage-them-with-natural-perimenopause-treatment/.

Avis, Nancy E., Sybil L. Crawford, Gail Greendale, Joyce T. Bromberger, Susan A. Everson-Rose,Ellen B. Gold, Rachel Hess, Hadine Joffe, Howard M. Kravitz, Ping G. Tepper, and Rebecca C. Thurston. "Duration of Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms Over the Menopause Transition." JAMA Internal Medicine175.4 (2015): 531-39. Print.

Laven, Joop. "Genetics of Early and Normal Menopause." Seminars in Reproductive Medicine 33.06 (2015): 377-83. PubMed.gov. Web. 13 Mar. 2017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26569518.

"What are Perimenopause, Menopause, and Postmenopause?" Cleveland Clinic. The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 5 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2017. http://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/what-is-perimenopause-menopause-postmenopause".

"Menopause In-Depth Report." The New York Times. The New York Times, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2017. http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/menopause/print.html.

Deliveliotou, Aikaterini, and George Creatsas. "Changes in the Vulva and Vagina Throughout Life." The Vulva (2006): 36-37. Print.

Bracy, Kate, RN, NP. "How Long Does Menopause Last?" Verywell. Ed. Board-certified Physician. N.p., 16 Dec. 2016. Web. 24 Feb. 2017. https://www.verywell.com/how-long-will-menopause-last-2322698.

Publications, Harvard Health. "Perimenopause: Rocky road to menopause." Harvard Medical School. Harvard Health Publications, 9 June 2009. Web. 24 Feb. 2017. http://www.health.harvard.edu/womens-health/perimenopause_rocky_road_to_menopause.

Avis, Nancy E., Sybil L. Crawford, Gail Greendale, Joyce T. Bromberger, Susan A. Everson-Rose, Ellen B. Gold, Rachel Hess, Hadine Joffe, Howard M. Kravitz, Ping G. Tepper, and Rebecca C. Thurston. "Duration of Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms Over the Menopause Transition." JAMA Internal Medicine175.4 (2015): 531-39. Print.

  • Your Results:

    Pre-Menopause

    Your survey answers suggest that you are likely in a stage called Pre-Menopause. You can learn more by visiting your doctor.

    What is
    Pre-Menopause?

    During pre-menopause, you have not yet reached menopause, and you are most likely fully fertile. Because you’ve had a period in the last three months you are likely still in your reproductive years.

    It’s possible for women to experience “peri-problems” (some of the symptoms commonly associated with menopause) before entering the phase. These symptoms can also be due to other conditions. Contact your doctor if you’re concerned about symptoms.

    Down the road we all go through the menopausal transition, so it’s helpful to know the common signs even if you’re not experiencing them yourself. Feel free to keep browsing pepper&wits so you can understand “the change” more.

    When speaking about phases of menopause, it might help to know that the phases are mostly defined by your fertility and hormone levels. By the time you reach menopause – which is defined as the point in time in which you have gone 12 consecutive months without a menstrual period – you have no more periods, have stopped producing estrogen, and are, generally speaking, no longer able to conceive.

    Looking Ahead: What to Expect During Peri-Menopause

    During the menopausal transition, your reproductive system is beginning to slow down as reproduction is no longer a biological priority. Hormonal changes take place throughout peri-menopause as your body prepares to exit your reproductive years. Estrogen and progesterone levels fluctuate (sometimes wildly) during this process. This is why irregular periods occur during peri-menopause. The duration of this process varies from woman to woman; on average, peri-menopause occurs for about 3-5 years before menopause, but sometimes it can last ten years or more. The average U.S. woman reaches menopause at 51 years old, which means peri-menopause typically occurs in the mid to late 40s. Roughly 1 percent of women experience premature menopause, which is when you reach menopause before age 40.

    Your Body:
    What’s Happening

    During peri-menopause, the ovaries are beginning to decrease their production of estrogen, but this is not necessarily a smooth process (estrogen levels during peri-menopause can vary day-to-day). This fluctuation in hormones is what causes physical changes and “peri-problems” such as hot flashes, night sweats, sleeplessness, headaches, mood swings, and fatigue. These are symptoms of estrogen withdrawal (ie: decreased estrogen), which will resolve with time.

    The fluctuating hormones help to explain the changes in menstrual cycles and fertility, but hormones do more than just handle our reproductive system. They also manage processes that impact bone density, mucosal production, and even our emotions.

    Estrogen, for instance, builds bone density. So in peri-menopause, you are at greater risk for increased bone density loss and resulting osteoporosis (“weak” or “porous bones”). Estrogen also facilitates vaginal lubrication, so with low estrogen levels in late peri-menopause and beyond, you can expect to have drier vaginal tissue and experience more painful sex. Hormones also influence our emotions and can lead us to experience mood swings.

    Ultimately, your ovaries will cease producing estrogen and progesterone when you reach menopause. The stage after peri-menopause and menopause is called post-menopause and it continues throughout the rest of your life. During post-menopause, the ovaries are no longer producing estrogen, which causes physical symptoms that can, unfortunately, worsen with time. These symptoms of estrogen deficiency (ie: lack of estrogen) include problems with bone density, joint health, skin changes, mucous membrane changes, genital disorders, and vaginal dryness.

    What You
    Can Do Now

    Consider keeping alcohol consumption to a minimum, and if you smoke tobacco, consider quitting. Smoking and excessive drinking can increase the likelihood of an earlier onset of menopause. Ensure that your diet includes appropriate amounts of vitamin D and calcium, and be sure to get a healthy amount of exercise. Getting the right amount of certain vitamins and exercise can help keep your bones strong and prepared for the menopausal transition.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    • Generally speaking, yes.

      You are fully fertile in pre-menopause unless there is another underlying issue disrupting your fertility. Female fertility issues can include ovulation disorders (i.e. polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothalamic dysfunction, premature ovarian failure, or too much prolactin), damage to the fallopian tubes, endometriosis, uterine or cervical causes, or undetermined causes. Keep in mind that age, smoking, your weight, sexual history, and alcohol consumption can all influence fertility.

    • No one can predict with 100 percent certainty when they will experience peri-menopause. Every one of us has a different rhythm to our reproductive timeline. However, your genetics do play a role in menopause. Speaking with older female relatives may give you a sense of what this experience might be like for you and when it might begin. However, you won’t really know what your exact experience will be like until you go through it yourself.

    • Talk with your doctor. She or he might give you a pelvic exam and ask for your age and menstrual history to find out if you have entered peri-menopause. Your medical practitioner might also give you a pregnancy test, FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) test, estrogen test, and/or TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) test to determine if you’re experiencing peri-menopause or if there are other factors causing symptoms.

  • Your Results:

    Early Peri-Menopause

    Your survey answers suggest that you are likely in a stage called Early Peri-Menopause. You can learn more by visiting your doctor.

    What is Early Peri-Menopause?

    Peri-menopause is divided into two stages: early and late. Your place in the journey can be indicated by the amount of time that has lapsed since your last menstrual period and any apparent menstrual irregularities.

    Early peri-menopause takes place when you have had a period within the last three months, but with irregularities. During early peri-menopause, your reproductive system is beginning to slow down as reproduction is no longer a biological priority. Hormonal changes take place throughout peri-menopause as your body prepares to exit your reproductive years. Estrogen and progesterone levels fluctuate (sometimes wildly) during this process. This is why irregular periods occur during early peri-menopause. Once you’ve gone 3 straight months with no period, you’re considered to be in late peri-menopause. Menopause occurs the moment you’ve gone 12 consecutive months with no period, then the post-menopause stage begins and continues throughout the rest of your life.

    Brace Yourself:
    What To Expect

    Many women describe peri-menopause as quite miserable. Others glide through the “peri-problems” (problems that arise during peri-menopause) with relative ease. Unfortunately, there are few scientifically-proven ways to predict what your peri-menopausal experience will be like. Ultimately, you will make it through and emerge stronger, wiser, and with zero periods(!).

    Some of the most common “peri-problems” include hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, painful intercourse, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, mood swings, and hair thinning. (Get to know the symptoms better in the Symptom section.) You may experience all of these, none of these, or some of these; every woman’s peri-menopausal journey is different. While you can’t predict with certainty what your experience will be like, you can be assured that there is an incredible support network of women going through similar “peri-problems” all over the world.

    Early peri-menopause typically lasts for one to three years. Once you go through 90 days without a menstrual period, you graduate into late peri-menopause (head to the Late Peri-Menopause section to learn more).

    The Emotional Journey

    Peri-menopause can take an emotional toll on you. Symptoms like hot flashes are not only uncomfortable and unpredictable, but they can also be embarrassing. Any women who’s been in peri-menopause for a few months probably has a witty way of playing-off her “private summers”. “The change” can take a toll on your relationships as well, especially when co-workers, families, or partners don’t understand or sympathize with what’s happening to you and your body.

    Peri-menopause is not a disease, but rather a life stage. It’s a biological process that every healthy woman of age will undergo (though that fact doesn’t make it any easier to accept!). Some women are confused and surprised by what’s happening to their bodies (you’ve probably thought “am I going crazy?” at some point). Just know that “peri-problems” are not all in your head and can generally be managed with a self-care, support, and treatment regimen (not to mention commiserating sessions with your girlfriends!). Also, know that you’re not alone in this journey. At any given time, there are 1 billion other women who are experiencing the menopause transition, and you are among the strongest, most resilient people in the world.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    • Yes. Though your fertility is declining during peri-menopause and it is more difficult to become pregnant, it is still possible. Until you stop ovulating and having accompanying periods, you can get pregnant. (It should be noted that there is also a greater risk for pregnancy complications as you age.)

      Once you reach menopause, the moment when you have gone through 12 consecutive months without a period, you typically cannot get pregnant. But even then you should consult with your doctor as there might be some variability with timing when it comes to fertility.

    • The length of time women will continue to work through these challenges varies across individuals. However, the “peri-problems” tend to get more severe closer to menopause (ie: in late peri-menopause) due to the more drastic decline in estrogen. Some “peri-problems” persist into post-menopause, though many eventually diminish or end altogether.

      Generally, symptoms of estrogen withdrawal (ie: decreased estrogen) such as hot flashes, night sweats, sleeplessness, headaches, mood swings, and fatigue will resolve with time. Symptoms of estrogen deficiency (ie: lack of estrogen) such as problems with bone density, joint health, skin changes, mucous membrane changes, genital disorders, and vaginal dryness may worsen with time.

    • Consult with your doctor. She or he may conduct a pelvic exam and ask for your age and menstrual history to discern whether you have entered peri-menopause. Your doctor may also give you a pregnancy test, FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) test, estrogen test and/or TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) test to determine whether you have reached peri-menopause or there is an alternative explanation for apparent “peri-problems”. However, even blood tests are not always conclusive as hormone levels can fluctuate daily during peri-menopause.

  • Your Results:

    Late Peri-Menopause

    Your survey answers suggest that you are likely in a stage called Late Peri-Menopause. You can learn more by visiting your doctor.

    What is Late Peri-Menopause?

    Peri-menopause is divided into two stages: early and late. Your place in the journey can be indicated by the amount of time that has lapsed since your last menstrual period and any apparent menstrual irregularities.

    (Note: Certain medical procedures, such as hysterectomy, or conditions, such as hyperthyroidism, can impact the regularity of your period, making your place in the menopause journey more difficult to estimate. You can speak with your doctor for more information.)

    You have now reached late peri-menopause, meaning you are charging through the final stretch before menopause. Keep calm and peri- on.

    On Your Way: What to Expect

    Where you are in the menopause transition is defined by your period irregularities. Early peri-menopause takes place when you have had a period within the last three months, but with irregularities. Once you’ve gone 3 straight months with no period, you’re considered to be in late peri-menopause, and menopause occurs the moment you’ve gone 12 consecutive months with no period. The post-menopause stage begins at menopause and continues throughout the rest of your life.

    By the time you reach late peri-menopause, you may have already gone through some hot flashes, mood swings, period irregularities, difficulty concentrating, and other unpleasant conditions, which we have nick-named “peri-problems.” Unfortunately, in late peri-menopause, these “peri-problems” tend to get more intense.

    A few things you can do to help make it through late peri-menopause seems are to maintain healthy habits, live vibrantly, and remove anything standing between you and the thermostat. Ultimately, you will make it through and emerge stronger, wiser, and with zero periods(!).

    The Emotional Journey

    Peri-menopause can take an emotional toll on you. Symptoms like hot flashes are not only uncomfortable and unpredictable, but they can also be embarrassing. Any women who’s been in late peri-menopause probably has a witty way of playing-off her “private summers”. “The change” can take a toll on your relationships as well, especially when co-workers, families, or partners don’t understand or sympathize with what’s happening to you and your body.

    Peri-menopause is not a disease, but rather a life stage. It’s a biological process that every healthy woman of age will undergo (though that fact doesn’t make it any easier to accept!). Some women are confused and surprised by what’s happening to their bodies (you’ve probably thought “am I going crazy?” at some point). Just know that “peri-problems” are not all in your head, and can generally be managed with a self-care, support, and treatment regimen (not to mention commiserating sessions with your girl friends!) Also, it’s important to know that you’re not alone in this journey. At any given time, there are 1 billion other women who are experiencing the menopause transition, and you are among the strongest, most resilient people in the world.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    • Yes. Though your fertility is declining during peri-menopause and it is more difficult to become pregnant, it is still possible. Until you stop ovulating and having accompanying periods, you can get pregnant. (Note that there is also a greater risk for pregnancy complications as you age.)

      Once you reach menopause, the moment when you have gone through 12 consecutive months without a period, you typically cannot get pregnant. But even then you should consult with your doctor as there might be some variability with timing when it comes to fertility.

    • The length of time women will continue to experience peri-menopausal symptoms varies across individuals. However, the “peri-problems” tend to get more severe closer to menopause (ie: in late peri-menopause) due to the more drastic decline in estrogen. Some “peri-problems” persist into post-menopause, though many eventually diminish or end altogether.

      Generally, symptoms of estrogen withdrawal (ie: decreased estrogen) such as hot flashes, night sweats, sleeplessness, headaches, mood swings, and fatigue will resolve with time. Symptoms of estrogen deficiency (ie: lack of estrogen) such as problems with bone density, joint health, skin changes, mucous membrane changes, genital disorders, and vaginal dryness may worsen with time.

      If you’re experiencing persistent “peri-problems”, you’re not the only one. In one study, researchers discovered that frequent hot flashes/night sweats lasted more than seven years during the menopausal transition for more than half of the women who were studied, and they continued for four and a half years after the women’s final period. Unfortunately, this shows that not all “peri-problems” will stop, even if your periods have.

    • No one can predict with 100 percent certainty when they will experience menopause. Every one of us has a different rhythm to our reproductive timeline. However, your genetics do play a role in menopause. Speaking with older female relatives may give you a sense of what this experience might be like for you and when it might begin. However, you won’t really know what your exact experience will be like until you go through it yourself.

      While general trends exist, the time of menopausal transition differs woman to woman. The average U.S. woman reaches menopause at 51 years old, which means peri-menopause typically occurs in the mid to late 40s. Roughly 1 percent of women experience premature menopause, which is when you reach menopause before age 40.

      If you’d like more information, consult with your doctor. She or he may conduct a pelvic exam and ask for your age and menstrual history to discern whether you have entered peri-menopause. Your doctor may also give you a pregnancy test, FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) test, estrogen test and/or TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) test to determine whether you have reached peri-menopause or there is an alternative explanation for apparent “peri-problems”. However, even blood tests are not always conclusive as hormone levels can fluctuate daily during peri-menopause.

  • Your Results:

    Post-Menopause

    Your survey answers suggest that you are likely in a stage called Post-Menopause. You can learn more by visiting your doctor.

    What is Post-Menopause?

    Post-menopause begins from the moment you reach menopause (the point in time when you have gone 12 consecutive months without a menstrual period), and it continues through the rest of your life. In post-menopause, your ovaries have stopped producing estrogen and you are no longer able to get pregnant. While post-menopause marks the end of your child-bearing years, it’s just the beginning of a new era in your life.

    (Note: Certain medical procedures, such as hysterectomy, or conditions, such as hyperthyroidism, can impact the regularity of your period, making your place in the menopause journey more difficult to estimate. Please visit your doctor for a diagnosis.)

    On your way

    You have now reached post-menopause, which means you’ve made it through most of the madness. You did it! You have officially joined a cohort of women who have been battle-tested by hot flashes, fuzzy memories, mood swings, insomnia, and whatever else your body threw at you. Your “peri-problems” will typically ease or end during post-menopause, and as an added bonus, you can say goodbye to periods, tampons, pads, and PMS!

    (Fun fact: The medical term for absence of a period is amenorrhea, or as we like to call it, AMEN-orrhea!)

    What to
    Expect

    Many women feel a sense of relief after moving through the often painful, confusing, and emotional challenges associated with peri-menopause. Most of these issues diminish in post-menopause… thank goodness.

    Generally, symptoms of estrogen withdrawal (ie: decreased estrogen) such as hot flashes, night sweats, sleeplessness, headaches, mood swings, and fatigue will resolve with time through post-menopause. However, symptoms of estrogen deficiency (ie: lack of estrogen) such as problems with bone density, joint health, skin changes, mucous membrane changes, genital disorders, and vaginal dryness may worsen with time.

    If you are still dealing with some of the “peri-problems” in post-menopause, you are not alone. Some of the more common challenges that persist into post-menopause include vaginal dryness and sensitive bladder.3 Even hot flashes can continue into post-menopause. In one study, researchers discovered that frequent hot flashes/night sweats lasted more than seven years during the menopausal transition for more than half of the women who were studied, and they continued for four and a half years after the women’s final period (ie four and a half years after menopause). While this isn’t great news (“when will it end?!”), it can be helpful to know that you’re not alone.

    Post-menopause is a normal, natural phase of life, and you’ve made it!. Hopefully you can look back and see with clarity your resilience and the resilience of the women before you for making it through the trials of peri-menopause. We really don’t get enough credit!

    Welcome to AMENorrhea and to the rest of your life!

    Frequently Asked Questions

    • In post-menopause, women are, generally speaking, no longer able to conceive or bear children. But you should always consult with our doctor because there may be some slight variability by person when it comes to fertility.

      No longer being able to have children may be difficult for some women to come to terms with, while other women are more than ready to accept this phase of life. Whatever your feelings about moving into post-menopause are, know that many women are going through similar emotional questions, pain, challenges, or feelings of relief.

    • The amount of time women will continue to encounter these challenges varies across individuals. Generally, symptoms of estrogen withdrawal (ie: decreased estrogen) such as hot flashes, night sweats, sleeplessness, headaches, mood swings, and fatigue will resolve with time through post-menopause, However, symptoms of estrogen deficiency (ie: lack of estrogen) such as problems with bone density, joint health, skin changes, mucous membrane changes, genital disorders, and vaginal dryness may worsen with time.

      If you are still dealing with some of the “peri-problems” in post-menopause, you are not alone. Some of the more common challenges that persist into post-menopause include vaginal dryness and sensitive bladder. Even hot flashes can continue into post-menopause. In one study, researchers discovered that frequent hot flashes/night sweats lasted more than seven years during the menopausal transition for more than half of the women who were studied, and they continued for four and a half years after the women’s final period (ie four and a half years after menopause). While this isn’t great news (“when will it end?!”), it can be helpful to know that you’re not alone.

      Vaginal dryness is another “peri-problem” that women in post-menopause continue to manage throughout their lives. Vaginal dryness is caused by lack of estrogen and can cause discomfort during everyday activities and during sex. While it’s very common (over half of all post-menopausal women experience vaginal dryness), it’s not often discussed publicly. Just know that you’re not alone and that there are solutions available.

    • If you have gone through menopause (the point in time when you have gone 12 months without a period) and you experience bleeding, you should visit your doctor to determine the cause.

      While not always serious, bleeding may indicate a medical problem, such as certain types of cancer or the thinning of uterine lining. Reach out to a medical professional if you notice post-menopausal bleeding.

  • Your Results:

    Menopause Stage Unclear

    After reviewing your survey answers, we are unable to estimate your place in the menopause journey at this time. Certain medical procedures, such as hysterectomy, or conditions, such as hyperthyroidism, can impact the regularity of your period, making your place in the menopause journey more difficult to estimate. Please visit your doctor for a diagnosis.

    An overview of the Menopause Journey

    Where we are in the menopause transition is defined by our menstrual period irregularities. From the beginning of your first menstrual period, we are considered to be in the Premenopause stage. Early Perimenopause takes place when we have had a period within the last three months, but with irregularities. Once we’ve gone 3 straight months with no period, we’re considered to be in Late Perimenopause, and The Menopause occurs the moment we’ve gone 12 consecutive months with no period. The Post Menopause stage begins at The Menopause continues on for the duration of our lives.